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Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging

Suggestions for research and links to resources on campus related to diversity and anti-racism

Welcome

This page serves as an introduction to resources and topics on Socioeconomic issues. 

Socioeconomic is related or involving a combination of social and economic factors. These factors include but are not limited to income, education, employment, community safety and social supports and networks. 

Socioeconomic status is the social standing or class of an individual or group. It is often measured as a combination of education, income and occupation. APA Definition 

  • First GenerationThe National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) defines first-generation college students as those who are enrolled in postsecondary education and whose parents do not have any postsecondary education experience. However, definitions vary between states, schools, and institutions, and we want to include you if you identify as first-generation based on your family’s level of educational attainment and limited exposure to or knowledge about attending college.
  • Low Income - The National Center for Education Statistics defines low income students as those whose family income was below 125 percent of the federally established poverty level for their family size.
    • Low-income college student is often defined as a student who qualifies to receive the Pell Grant, a federal grant provided to students who qualify based on information on their FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).
    • You might also identify as low-income if you experience food or housing insecurity, are eligible for government assistance programs, or cannot afford other basic needs. 
  • Undocumented -  An undocumented student is someone who has entered the United States with no formal checkpoint, inspections, or verification, or who has overstayed a temporary visa. We also want to recognize students who are DACA recipients, have undocumented family members (mixed-status families), and anyone else who identifies with the undocumented experience (“undocu-plus”).

Definitions from the Northeastern University CIE FUNL Definitions

Research

These tabs offer a small selection of resources on socio-economics issues and topics. To view more recommendations explore the Snell Library website

Explore these databases to find articles and other resources: 

  • ERIC - A nearly comprehesive online library of education research and information, including scholarly article citations, citations to professional literature, education dissertations, and book listings.  Grey literature such as curriculum guides, conference proceedings, government publications, and white papers.
  • Education Research Complete - Education Research Complete provides indexing and abstracts for more than 1,870 journals, as well as full text for more than 1,060 journals, and includes full text for more than 133 books and monographs, and for numerous education-related conference papers.
  • Journal of the First Year Experience & Students in Transition 

Articles 

Looking for a topic? 

Consider one of these:

  • Social class
  • Educational disparities 
  • Immigration and Education
  • DACA students 

Northeastern & Beyond Resources

We invite you to explore different organizations available at Northeastern University and in our surrounding communities: 

Northeastern Organizations: 


Broader Organizations: 

MIRA - Massachusetts Immigration & Refugee Advocacy Coalition
 

Selected Readings: