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Public Health: Searching PubMed

A guide to finding online resorces for public health research

PubMed

PubMed is the National Library of Medicine's open-access database, encompassing Medline,a health information clearinghouse of articles from the National Library of Medicine, plus articles deposited by authors and publishers as part of National Institutes of Health funding requirements.

Link to PubMed through Snell Library's website to access NU's full text journal subscriptions for authorized users.

Introducing New PubMed

Searching PubMed

What's the Difference Between PubMed, PMC and Medline?

PubMed Clinical Queries

Looking for reliable clinical studies?  Try PubMed's Clinical Queries search option to locate evidence-based practice citations.  Clinical Queries is divided into 3 sections:

1. Clinical Studies searches use-preset filters which allow you to quickly locate articles on etiology, diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of diseases.
    Clinical Studies offers five clinical study categories to choose from:

  • Therapy: The therapy filter will retrieve clinical studies that discuss the treatment of diseases. You will notice that therapy is the search default.
  • Diagnosis: Click on diagnosis to find clinical studies addressing disease diagnosis.
  • Etiology: Click on etiology to find clinical studies addressing causation/harm in disease and diagnostics.
  • Prognosis: Click on prognosis to find clinical studies addressing disease prognosis.
  • Clinical Prediction Guides: Click on clinical prediction guides to find clinical studies which discuss methods for predicting the likelihood of disease presence or absence.

2. Systematic Reviews cover a broad set of articles that build consensus on biomedical topics. Locate reviews on clinical trials, guidelines, meta-
    analyses, consensus development conferences.

3. Medical Genetics searches find citations and abstracts related to various topics in medical genetics.